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Halliburton software grant aids students at WVU Statler College

Josh Dietz, WVU graduate student who uses Halliburton’s ARIES petroleum economics in his coursework and GOHFER fracture modeling software in his research.

Josh Dietz, WVU graduate student who uses Halliburton’s ARIES petroleum economics in his coursework and GOHFER fracture modeling software in his research. 

Students at West Virginia University’s Benjamin M. Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources will gain practical experience using industry-leading energy exploration and production software thanks to a multimillion-dollar grant by Halliburton Landmark, a Halliburton Company business line.

The in-kind grant includes 200 licenses and maintenance for multiple Halliburton software products focused on geoscience, drilling, economics, production, reservoir management and seismic processing. The company’s three-year gift bolsters instruction, scholarship and research within the Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering.

“Halliburton software is widely utilized in the oil and gas industry, and this generous grant will help ensure that our students graduate with the most up-to-date skills and experience with the right technology to join the workforce and have an immediate impact,” Samuel Ameri, professor and chair of the Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, said. “The software is also essential in the research efforts of the Department, which are focused on technologies that will improve the recovery efficiency of both oil and natural gas from difficult-to-produce reservoirs around the world.”

Founded in 1919, Halliburton is one of the world’s largest providers of products and services to the energy industry. Halliburton and the WVU’s Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering have an almost 20 years working relationship that ensures the company’s latest technological tools are available to students for projects, exams, theses, dissertations and more.  

“We are excited to continue our commitment to WVU and to see how students use our software programs to develop valuable skillsets for their future careers,” said Nagaraj Srinivasan, senior vice president of Landmark, Halliburton Digital Solutions and Consulting.

Josh Dietz is a graduate student from Richmond, Virginia. He has used Halliburton’s ARIES petroleum economics in his coursework and GOHFER fracture modeling software in his research. He hopes to work in research and development for industry upon completing his doctorate at WVU.

“I think it is very important to have access to the software, because with the software we can dive deeper into understanding the principles behind fracture development and reservoir development,” Dietz said. “It provides a chance for visual learning, which is a great benefit to many students. I am also a teaching assistant for the Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering and have seen the improvement in learning for students when implementing the software.”

Cindi L. Roth, president and CEO of the WVU Foundation, expressed her gratitude for lasting relationships with strong corporate partners like Halliburton. The company’s generosity ensures WVU produces highly skilled graduates prepared to make an immediate impact in an evolving industry. 

“The knowledge and experience gained through working with this software is truly invaluable for petroleum engineering students at WVU,” Roth said. “Now more than ever, ensuring accessibility to these vital education resources is critical. Halliburton’s generosity to support students remains incredible and continues to transform WVU.”

Halliburton’s grant was made through the WVU Foundation, the nonprofit organization that receives and administers private donations on behalf of the University. Halliburton Landmark contributes renewable software licenses to more than 200 qualified academic institutions worldwide as a part of its commitment to supporting and engaging future energy industry talent.

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